Retro TV W/C 14th March 2008

by Modculture 13 March, 2008

Vanessa_68
Barry Murphy
returns once more trawl the TV and radio guides (so you don’t have to) to find anything worth tuning into this week. All listings are for UK terrestrial TV, Freeview and national radio, with the shows running from Friday 14th March to Thursday 20th March.

Highlights of the week

The tumultuous events of 1968 are recalled in a number of radio and TV programmes this week, looking at the role of writers, actors and musicians in the street battles that marked the year – and whether they helped to change western society and culture. The South Bank Show – Revolution 68 (ITV 1. Sun 15th.11.15pm) includes extracts from two never before broadcast interviews from 1968: one with Mick Jagger, shortly after he attended the rally in Grosvenor Square; and another with an angry John Lennon as he responded to attacks from the far left at the end of 1968. John Tusa and guests discuss the impact in 1968: the Year of Revolutions (Radio 4. Tues 18th. 9am), while a daily spot on Radio 4, 1968: Day-by-day (Beginning Mon 17th. 4.55pm) recalls the major political, cultural and social events of that day in history.

On a lighter note, BBC 4 begins it’s Curse of Comedy season with the evolution of innuendo on the Beeb in Auntie’s War on Smut (Tues 18th. 9pm) and the first of a short series of docu-dramas exploring the inner demons of some of Britain’s most loved entertainers opens with The Curse of Steptoe (Weds 19th, 9pm) starring Phil Davis and Jason Isaacs. Finally, ITV 4 begin another of their re-runs of classic sixties TV with The Prisoner (Weds, 19th. 8pm), while earlier the same day Paul Jackson tells the story behind the making of the show in Britain in a Box ( BBC Radio 4. 1.30pm).

Friday 14th March

TV

Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) – ITV 4. 6.00pm – 7.00pm
Marty is shocked to find Jeff has lost the ability to see or hear him.

Space 1999 – ITV 4. 7.00pm – 8.00pm
The team revive a group of humans from another planet who have been frozen for 300 years.

Tin Sandwich, Anyone? A History of the Harmonica – BBC 4. 8.00pm – 9.00pm
A look at the instrument and it’s influence on artists from all over the world. Featuring interviews with, and performances by, Rory McLeod and Brendan Power. Narrated by Russell Davies.

Batman – BBC 4. 11.35pm – 12.25am
Double bill of the dynamic duo, this week featuring King Tut.

Saturday 15th March

TOTP2 – Dave. 7.00am – 9.00am
More classic pop clips.

Film: Never Say Never Again (1983) – ITV 1. 3.05pm – 4.40pm (Continues 510pm – 610pm)
Sean Connery’s last adventure as James Bond. Agent 007 comes out of retirement to foil a plot to hold the world to ransom, and has to get back into shape to confront arch enemies Blofield and Largo.

The Hard Sell (3/6) – BBC 4. 9.30pm – 10.00pm
How advertisers have used commercials to sell food and drink in Britain in the last 50 years.

The Sweeney – ITV 4. 9.30pm – 10.30pm
A villain comes out of hiding to try to retrieve his stolen loot.

The Rise and Fall of the Ad Man – BBC 4. 10.00pm – 11.00pm
Timeshift looks at the history of British advertising, from its roots in 1970s Madison Avenue to its fall in the 1980s.

Soho Sex King: the Paul Raymond Story – Channel 4. 11.25pm – 12.30am
How the sexual revolution was absorbed into mainstream British culture during the 1970s, focusing on the late Paul Raymond, who introduced Reader’s Wives and Men Only to the nation.

Film: Dead Man’s Shoes (2004) – Film4. 11.25pm – 1.10am
Thriller starring Paddy Considine. Tortured ex-army man Richard returns to the rural Midlands village of his youth to take violent revenge on a drugs gang who exploited his brother.

Dog Altogether  – Film4. 1.10am – 1.30am
Bafta-winning short film about an alcoholic seeking redemption, written and directed by Paddy Considine.

Shane’s World – Film4. 1.30am – 3.00am
Director Shane Meadows introduces three of his short films.

Radio

Sounds of the 60s – BBC Radio 2. 8.00am – 10.00am
Brian Matthew spins two hours of hits, B -sides and album tracks.

The Funk and Soul Show – BBC Radio 6. 6.00pm – 9.00pm
3 hours of funk, soul and blues presented by Craig Charles.

Live and Exclusive: Van Morrison – BBC Radio 2. 8.00pm – 9.00pm
Recorded on 12 February at the BBC’s Radio Theatre, Morrison performs songs from his new album and career-defining classics. 

Sunday 16th March

TV

The Sweeney – ITV 4. 7.00pm – 8.00pm
The flying squad attempt to catch a gunman who has stolen cash.

The Cult of Sunday Night (7/8) – BBC 4. 8.00pm – 8.30pm
Bergerac. The appeal of the drama, which helped boost the Jersey tourist industry.

The Professionals – ITV 4. 8.00pm – 9.00pm
Bodie and Doyle are marked men when they begin an investigation.

Selling Power: the Ad Men and Number Ten – BBC 4. 9.00pm – 10.00pm (Repeated 11.15pm)
Documentary detailing the role played by advertisement industry in engaging public interest in the politics of the 20th century.

Hammer House of Horror – ITV 3. 9.00pm – 10.05pm
A family move into a house which has been left derelict since a macabre murder was committed there.

Mad Men (3/13) – BBC 4. 10.00pm – 10.50pm
Marriage of Figaro. Don and Rachel act on their mutual attraction for each other.

The South Bank Show – Revolution 68 – ITV 1. 11.15pm – 12.15am
It was the year when a demonstration protesting against the Vietnam War marched towards the American Embassy in London’s Grosvenor Square and there were violent protests in Paris, Prague and Chicago. Melvyn Bragg explores the role of writers, actors and musicians in the street battles, and asks whether they helped change western society. With Vanessa Redgrave and Tom Stoppard, plus rare interviews with Mick Jagger and John Lennon.

Monday 17th March

TV

The Cult of Sunday Night (7/8) – BBC 4. 7.30pm – 8.00pm
Bergerac. The appeal of the drama, which helped boost the Jersey tourist industry.

Steptoe and Son – BBC 4. 8.00pm – 8.30pm
The Economist. Harold decides it may be wise to buy in bulk.

Quatermass (1/4) – ITV 4. 8.00pm – 9.00pm
After years of living in the Scottish Highlands, a professor returns to London and has to battle sinister forces threatening Earth.

Film: The Life and Death of Peter Sellers (2003) – BBC 4. 9.00pm – 10.55pm
Biographical drama starring Geoffrey Rush. Following the success in The Goon Show, Peter Sellers sets his sights on Hollywood superstardom, but the cost of his ruthless ambition is a deep insecurity and a loss of identity.

The Peter Sellers Story – as He Filmed it – BBC 4. 10.55pm – 12.25am
Documentary chronicling the life of comic genius Peter Sellers.

Film: The Big Boss (1971) – Five. 11.05pm – 1.00am
Martial arts drama starring Bruce Lee. Promising his mother he will stay out of trouble, Cheng Chao-An travels to Bangkok to work alongside relatives in an ice factory. But when his cousins are attacked, Cheng cannot remain uninvolved.

Radio

1968: Day-by-day – BBC Radio 4. 4.55pm – 5.00pm
John Tusa presents the first in a daily series to run for six months that recalls the major political, cultural and social events of that day in 1968. Today, anti-Vietnam protests erupt in London.

Paul Jones – BBC Radio 2. 7.00pm – 8.00pm
Classic R&B and the cream of the new releases, plus a live session from trad jazz trombonist Chris Barber.

Tuesday 18th March

TV

Sounds of the 60s – BBC 4. 7.30pm – 7.35pm
Music from the archives featuring the Johnny Harris Orchestra. This one is really rather good.

Batman (1/2) – BBC 4. 7.35pm – 8.00pm
A gangster family, led by Ma Parker, invades Gotham City. Concludes tomorrow at 7.35pm.

Quatermass (2/4) – ITV 4. 8.00pm – 9.00pm
The professor takes Annie and Isabel to London.

Auntie’s War on Smut – BBC 4. 9.00pm – 10.00pm
The Curse of Comedy season begins with a documentary about the evolution of innuendo on the BBC.       

The Hard Sell (4/6) – BBC 4. 10.30pm – 11.00pm
How advertisers have used TV commercials to sell children’s toys over the last 50 years.

ONE Life – Help! My Kid’s a Rock Star – BBC 1. 10.35pm – 11.15pm
The parents of musicians including Amy Winehouse and Suggs talk about how their children’s lifestyles have affected them.

Mad Men (3/13) – BBC 2. 11.20pm – 12.05am
Marriage of Figaro. Don and Rachel act on their mutual attraction for each other.

Radio

1968: the Year of Revolutions – BBC Radio 4. 9.00am – 9.45am
From civil rights marches in the US to riots in Paris, John Tusa and guests discuss the impact of the tumultuous world events of 1968, in this intermittent series. Marking the 40th anniversary of the demonstrations in Grosvenor Square.

1968: Day-by-day – BBC Radio 4. 4.55pm – 5.00pm
After the rioting, the clean-up begins, while the City faces a major financial crisis.

Wednesday 19th March

The Saint – ITV 4. 6.00pm – 7.00pm
Simon encounters a deadly lady with a gun and an attitude.

Sounds of the 60s – BBC 4. 7.30pm – 7.35pm
Music from the archives featuring Nana Mouskouri.

Batman – (2/2) – BBC 4. 7.35pm – 8.00pm
Ma Parker attempts to escape from prison.

The Prisoner – ITV 4. 8.00pm – 9.00pm
Number Six learns the location of the Village from a Russian prisoner.

The Curse of Steptoe – BBC 4. 9.00pm – 10.05pm
Part of the Curse of Comedy season, this docu-drama offers an insight into Steptoe and Son actors Harry H Corbett and Wilfred Brambell.

Steptoe and Son – BBC 4. 10.05pm – 10.35pm
Very first episode of the classic comedy.

Mark Lawson Talks to Galton and Simpson – BBC 4. 11.05pm – 12.05am
Interview with the writers who created Steptoe and Son and Hancock’s Half Hour.

Radio

Britain in a Box – BBC Radio 4. 1.30pm – 2.00pm
A Still Tongue Makes for a Quiet Life. Paul Jackson tells the story behind the making of The Prisoner, starring Patrick McGoohan, which ran fro only 17 episodes yet has a worldwide following.

1968: Day-by-day – BBC Radio 4. 4.55pm – 5.00pm
Andy Warhol disappoints UK fans.

Stuart Maconie – BBC Radio 2. 8.00pm – 10.00pm
With a live set from the Black Keys.

The Reggae Show – BBC Radio 2. 10.00pm – 11.00pm
Mark Lamarr returns with another series.

Jerseybeat – the Four Seasons Story (4/4) – BBC Radio 2. 11.00pm- 11.30pm
Paul Sexton concludes a profile of 1960s pop giants the Four Seasons, this week looking at their on-and-off success since the mid-70s.

Thursday 20th March

TV

Steptoe and Son – BBC 4. 7.30pm – 8.00pm
The Diploma. Harold decides to leave the rag-and-bone trade for good.

Ashes to Ashes (7/8) – BBC 1. 9.00pm – 10.00pm
Will a Police 5 reconstruction help to catch the robbers of an obsessive-compulsive charity fundraiser?

Ashes to Ashes (6/8) – BBC 4. 10.00pm – 11.00pm
Alex takes control of a murder case as Gene begins to realise that he’s not getting any younger.

Mad Men (3/13) – BBC 4. 11.00pm – 11.45pm
Marriage of Figaro. Don and Rachel act on their mutual attraction for each other.

Selling Power: the Ad Men and Number Ten – BBC 4. 11.45pm – 12.45am
Documentary detailing the role played by advertisement industry in engaging public interest in the politics of the 20th century.

Radio

How Robin Ince Got His Groove Back – BBC Radio 4. 11.30am – 12.00pm
The comedian asks whether pop music fandom has been consigned to the history books and if his was the last generation of truly obsessed pop kids. With Stewart Lee and Andrew Collins.

1968: Day-by-day – BBC Radio 4. 4.55pm – 5.00pm
Prince Philip is the first member of the royal family to be interviewed live on TV.