Official release: The Who – Live at The Fillmore East 1968 CD and vinyl

by Modculture 15 February, 2018

Official release: The Who - Live at The Fillmore East 1968 CD and vinyl

Official release: The Who – Live at The Fillmore East 1968 CD and vinyl

It has been kicking about as a bootleg for some time, but now The Who – Live at The Fillmore East 1968 has been cleaned up for an official release on CD and vinyl.

It’s to mark the 50th anniversary of the show, which took place on Saturday 6th April 2018, although the band did platy the venue the night before too. Both nights were recorded by Who manager Kit Lambert with the intention of releasing the set as the Who’s fourth album after Sell Out and before Tommy. It obviously never happened.

Songs from the second night have been restored and mixed by Who sound engineer Bob Pridden (who was there in 1968), with the recording remastered for optimum sound quality, the result of which is said to ‘enhance The Who’s reputation as the best live act of the time’.

The set features extended versions of My Generation, A Quick One…, Shakin’ All Over and many other Who classics plus a version of Eddie Cochran’s C’mon Everybody (unavailable elsewhere). Fortune Teller was also played at these shows for the first time and unique live versions of Tattoo and Relax from ‘Who Sell Out’ are also here.

The set will be released on CD and vinyl on 20th April 2018, with pre-orders now being taken. The CD is a two-disc set (although the second disc just seems to be My Generation, while the vinyl set also has an extra set featuring the same song over (I presume) two sides. Track listing below. £9.86 for the CD, £29.67 for the vinyl.

The Who – Live at The Fillmore East 1968 CD at Amazon

The Who – Live at The Fillmore East 1968 vinyl at Amazon

Track listing:

1. Summertime Blues
2. Fortune Teller
3. Tattoo
4. Little Billy
5. I Can’t Explain
6. Happy Jack
7. Relax
8. I’m A Boy
9. A Quick One
10. My Way
11. C’mon Everybody
12. Shakin’ All Over
13. Boris The Spider

Plus My Generation





“Baracuta”